Category: Garden & Foraging (page 1 of 6)

Growing Self Sufficiency: Start Your Journey Of Self Sufficiency

*This post contains affiliate links.  If you click on one and make a purchase, I may make a small commission at no cost to you.  Thank you for supporting this site.*

 

Self sufficiency is a growing trend right now–and for good reason.  Once you get a taste of providing for yourself, you realize it’s one of the most rewarding adventures you could pursue.  From having a few potted plants or a beehive on your balcony, to having full-out acreage with larger animals, there is a level of self sufficiency we can all achieve when we’re willing to put in the time and sweat.

Knowing where and how to start is often what keeps us from taking that first step.  Once we map out our direction and choose a starting point, this new plan becomes our driving force.

If you are looking for that driving force, or just want a little bit more information before you further your journey, then this is one resource you’re going to find incredibly helpful.

Continue reading

How To Get Rid Of Gophers: Lethal And Non-Lethal Methods

*This post contains affiliate links.  If you click on one and make a purchase, I may make a small commission at no cost to you.  Thank you for supporting this site.*

 

Get rid of gophers in gardens and fields. Lists both lethal and non-lethal techniques.

Gophers are a pest known to many gardeners, and hated by most.  They live in all areas of North America except for the far north and east.

With their front claws and front teeth, gophers dig tunnels 6-12 inches below ground that can be up to 800 feet long.  These tunnels are concentrated in open fields, lawns, and the gardens we love.

While a mole will dig tunnels and eat mainly grubs and worms, gophers go right for our good stuff—our coveted produce and flowers.  They aren’t overly picky, and will eat buds, grass, nuts, roots, and vegetables.  Carrots, lettuce, and radishes are a favorite, although any vegetable that is juicy will do.  I have a particular problem keeping them away from my young pepper plants.

In our area, with it’s short growing season, gophers have one main breeding season, and that’s usually in June.  One minute we’ve got a few tunnels, and we’re planting our garden.  The next minute, we’re overrun with gophers.  I’ve learned over the years that if I can employ a variety of means to get rid of them in June, the rest of my season isn’t so bad.

If you live in a warmer climate, however, you could see 3-4 breeding cycles a year in your area.  How do you get rid of gophers?  It’s not easy to do, and it’s a task I have to tackle every single year.

Here are some ways you can try to rid yourself of these rodents from killing them to trying to convince them to leave on their own, and some other things you’ll need to think about as you consider your options.

Continue reading

The Secrets To Growing Summer Squash And Common Varieties

*This post contains affiliate links.  If you click on one and make a purchase, I may make a small commission at no cost to you.  Thank you for supporting this site.*

 

The term squash generally includes summer squash, winter squash, and pumpkins.  Summer squash are the weak-stemmed, tender annuals that usually grow as a bush and include zucchini, yellow squash, and patty pan squash.

They are usually eaten in their immature stage while the skins are still thin and tender.

If there’s one thing anyone can grow, it’s summer squash.  With little maintenance, these fast growers quickly take over any space in a garden.

Continue reading

How To Grow Tomatoes: Tips From A Large Scale Gardener

*This post contains affiliate links.  If you click on one and make a purchase, I may make a small commission at no cost to you.  Thank you for supporting this site.*

 

Probably the most common vegetable you will find in any food garden is the tomato—which is technically a fruit.  Both new and experienced gardeners alike love to grow tomatoes for their color and fragrance in the garden as well as their flavor and versatility in the kitchen.

Because of the diversity of varieties tomatoes come in, you can grow a different size, color and even shape of tomato every year and never get bored.  Red, yellow, green, black, purple, and white are just a few colors you’ll find when you start researching these tasty treats.

Whether you’ve got a large plot to grow in this year, or just one pot of dirt, you’re sure to find a variety that will work for you and give you an abundant bounty during your growing season.

Continue reading

Planning A Focused Garden On Intense Homestead Years

*This post contains affiliate links.  If you click on one and make a purchase, I may make a small commission at no cost to you.  Thank you for supporting this site.*

 

There’s no doubt about it, some years on the homestead are so intense that you need to cut back in certain areas to get through it all.  Perhaps you’re learning a new skill that takes up your time.  Maybe finances, weather, or family circumstances keep you from your full homesteading capacity.  Whatever your reasoning, changing your regular garden plans to a focused garden plan is going to make that one area more manageable.

In my book, Raising Young Children On The Homestead, I talk about the basic principles of a focused garden, and how it will get you through your intense homestead years (such as when you have a newborn).  It discusses how to plan a unique focused garden that will meet the needs of an individual family.

I also tell you how and when I started doing my own focused gardens to meet the consumption needs of my own family.

This year is one of those years—an intense homestead year in which I have to cut back in some areas.  Gardening is one of those areas, and I’m falling back to the focused garden plan we’ve used in the past.

Here is the focused garden plan that works best for our family during the intense years.

Continue reading

19 White Fruits And Vegetables You Need To Grow This Year

It’s time once again to plan our gardens for the upcoming season.  Have you got everything planned out?  Have you got your seeds ordered, mapped out your garden plot, and written your plans in your garden journal?

No?

Then perhaps this year you’ll try something new–like a white themed garden. Did you know many of the most delicious  fruits and vegetables out there come in a white variety?

Continue reading

How To Grow Cucumbers: The Warm Weather Vegetable

*This post contains affiliate links.  If you click on one and make a purchase, I may make a small commission at no cost to you.  Thank you for supporting this site.*

 

Cucumbers are an annual warm weather crop that are easy for some gardeners to grow, yet others find nearly impossible to work with.  They require only a short growing season of usually 55-65 days from planting to harvest, and can be harvested for a month or more.  This makes them ideal for our 70 day growing season.

If the right variety is picked, cucumbers can be grown in just about any part of the United States.  For specific planting dates in your area, check with your local extension office.  They should also be able to suggest a good variety for your area, and if you have a longer growing season, they can help you with a schedule for succession planting if you wish.

Continue reading

Resolve To Grow An Abundant Garden This Year

*This post contains affiliate links.  If you click on one and make a purchase, I may make a small commission at no cost to you.  Thank you for supporting this site.*

 

If you’ve never had a garden, or you have but don’t feel successful when you have, then you may be yearning to not only grow a garden, but grow a successful and abundant garden this year—and I think that’s exciting!

So what has stopped you in the past?  Time?  Knowledge?  A plan?

Relax future gardener, there’s help.  There are seven simple steps to take to help you grow your best garden yet this year.  And—they aren’t that hard—I promise.

Continue reading

Perennials Vs. Annuals: Picking The Right Combination For Your Personality & Needs

When planning your garden, you’ll be faced with almost innumerable options.

  • Where will you put it?
  • What will you plant in it?
  • How much will you plant?
  • Will you color coordinate vegetables?
  • Should you inter-plant flowers with your crops?
  • How many of your plants will you let go to seed?
  • How much money will you spend on seeds?
  • What kind of fencing and protection do you need?
  • Will you plant perennials or annuals?

If you’ve never planted a garden before you may just plant whatever seeds you find wherever you’ve already got free space.  It may work, and it may not.

But if you’re in a phase where you want to start planning strategically to either become more self-sufficient, or just want healthier foods readily available for your family, then you’ll need to be more deliberate with your decisions.

Continue reading

13 Ways To Save Money In Your Vegetable Garden

*This post contains affiliate links.  If you click on one and make a purchase, I may make a small commission at no cost to you.  Thank you for supporting this site.*

 

There’s no doubt about it, growing a garden can mean a lot of money saved in food expenses.  It can, however, also be a very expensive activity if you let it.  It starts off so innocently, and before you know it, you’ve invested a lot of money into that beautiful patch of produce.

Fortunately, there are some tips you can use to keep your expenses down–even at a minimum when your budget is tight.  It takes a bit of planning and dedication, but with persistence and determination, you can keep your out of pocket expenses down with these tricks.

Continue reading

Older posts

© 2018

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑