Tag: Tomatoes

Planting Tomato Starts Into The Ground

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Nothing goes into the ground until June 1 around here.  This year, we had a freeze on June 10, so I didn’t transplant my tomato starts out until after that.

Obviously, with a 70 day growing season, we can’t start tomatoes by seed in the soil here.  Instead, I start my plants early and grow them inside until they can be moved to the greenhouse, and eventually out into the ground.

This year, for my outside tomatoes, I started Golden Nugget, Yellow Pear, and Amish Paste by seed inside.  Because of our lack of light here in the north, I can only start my own tomatoes with the assistance of grow lights if I want to eventually grow them out in the soil and have them be productive.  My plant room has north and west facing windows.  It’s not ideal, but with the grow lights, it works out.

Once there is enough daylight and the greenhouse is warm enough to encourage adequate growth, my tomato starts make their way out there.  This year I was fortunate enough to move all my tomato starts out during a set of overcast days.

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How To Grow Tomatoes: Tips From A Large Scale Gardener

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Probably the most common vegetable you will find in any food garden is the tomato—which is technically a fruit.  Both new and experienced gardeners alike love to grow tomatoes for their color and fragrance in the garden as well as their flavor and versatility in the kitchen.

Because of the diversity of varieties tomatoes come in, you can grow a different size, color and even shape of tomato every year and never get bored.  Red, yellow, green, black, purple, and white are just a few colors you’ll find when you start researching these tasty treats.

Whether you’ve got a large plot to grow in this year, or just one pot of dirt, you’re sure to find a variety that will work for you and give you an abundant bounty during your growing season.

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How A Tomato Turns Red & Ripening Green Tomatoes

It’s the end of your gardening season, and it’s getting too cold at night to keep your tomatoes alive anymore.  Problem is, many of them are still green.  Do you pull them up?  Toss them out?  Let them freeze and break down and feed next year’s soil?

You could.

Or you can do what I do every year.  I never waste a tomato.  I ripen green tomatoes after the season.  There are actually many ways to get this done.  Some are easy, some are hard.  Some ripen your green tomatoes slow, and some techniques ripen them quite fast.

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Two Ways To Dehydrate Tomatoes & Tomato Chip Recipe

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There are four options when you have a lot of tomatoes.  You can eat them fresh, freeze them, bottle them, or dehydrate them.  Here, we will discuss how to dehydrate tomatoes by a couple different methods, and then how to use your dehydrated tomatoes once you’ve done this.

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Tomato Planter

I’m done with tomato cages.  Forever.

Every year I’d buy a few more because the old ones were wearing out.

Every year I’d try my hardest to keep a growing tomato plant inside them.

Oh sure, they looked nice all lined up, or in a grid pattern.  But honestly, I would often get frustrated with them.  And I absolutely hated pulling the smelly frozen vines off of them after they froze.  Pulling them out of the ground when we were done often had to wait until the next year once the ground was frozen.

Some of them were strong enough to hold up the sleeping bags and thick blankets that I’d drape over them as fall approached.  Some of them weren’t.

I was ready for something new.

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