Teaching Your Children Their First Homestead Recipes

A homestead kitchen is just like a modern kitchen in many aspects:

  • There is a place to store food
  • There is a place to prepare food
  • There is a means to cook the food

However, there is no doubt there are differences in these two kitchens as well. Homestead kitchens often have wood stoves if they are indoor, and open fires if they are outdoors.  The knives are bigger and more plentiful.

So how then do we get our kids working in the kitchen and cooking from an early age?

First, take a look at Keeping Kids Safe In The Homestead Kitchen.  You’ll get ideas on how to not only keep your kids safe, but how to do it from a young age–because the younger they learn to be safe in the kitchen, the better, right?  Then once they learn to stay safe, the next logical step is to get them cooking, right?

Right.

 

The homestead kitchen is full of fresh produce grown and foraged for locally.  It has plenty of healthy, fresh eggs straight from the coop.  Often, fresh baked bread is a staple.  There is no doubt that a dedicated homestead feeds their family healthier foods than the average family.

We already know that children who help in the garden take pride in the produce they’ve grown and tend to eat healthier as a result.  Children who eat healthy tend to continue that trend and eat healthier as adults.  When you grow your own food on the homestead, you’re doing a huge service to your children and family.

Studies also show that children who help prepare their own food take pride in the food they’ve prepared and are more apt to eat it.  When your children already take pride in the food they’ve grown and then turn around and take part in preparing it, you’ve set them up for healthy success.

The only problem is, many parents don’t know where to start.

What age is best?

What are the first lessons you should teach your child?

What are the easiest recipes to start them on?  (That are still helpful.)

Knives. Wood stoves. Open fires. Don't be intimidated by your homestead kitchen. Use these tips to teach your kids to cook YOUR family recipes. You can do this.

Good news parents, I’ve got you covered.  In my recently released eBook, Kid’s First Homestead Recipes, I’ll tell you how and where to start.  You’ll see how I started all my kids (and there are plenty of them) from a young age how to be big helpers in the family.

You’re also going to learn some of my family’s recipes, in addition to learning how to adapt your family’s favorite recipes into creations your kids are going to beg you to let them help with–and then make on their own.

What if breakfast was on the table when you made it to the kitchen in the morning?

What if you knew when you weren’t around your children were not only picking healthy foods, but likely eating hearty and hot meals as well?

What if you could stop worrying they were going to hurt themselves in the kitchen when you weren’t looking?

If you’re thinking to yourself, Yes!  This is what I want! then know that it won’t be automatic–but it will come with some tips I’ve used.  With some time and effort you’ll have them cooking in the kitchen from an earlier age.  They’ll take pride in their accomplishments, and desire to have a work ethic within your home.

Don’t expect lasagna from your four-year-old next week.  But do expect what your young child is preparing will be made carefully with skill and love.  Best of all, it will be tailored to your family’s tastes.

Kids' First Homestead Recipes
Kids' First Homestead Recipes
Learn to help your children be safe and productive in the homestead kitchen from a young age. With a little guidance, they can be making your family's favorite recipes in no time!
Price: $6.99

 

Get your copy now, and get cooking!

 

2 Comments

  1. My wee ones love to help in the kitchen. Your eBook sounds great; kid friendly recipes are a must around here.

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